A Little R&R

July 17, 2014. Category: inspiration

After an incredible (but exhausting!) spring and early summer filled with weddings, our office will be closed July 21-26th.

From California to Montana and all the way to Alaska, each of us will be enjoying some time away in various locations over the next week which we are anxious to explore.

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Best of Washington

July 08, 2014. Category: corporate, event

We are delighted to be working with The Washingtonian Magazine once again this year to bring the Best of Washington Party to life.  Come enjoy food and cocktails at the National Building Museum to celebrate Washington’s 75 best restaurants.

To purchase tickets, please visit Washingtonian.com

But don’t wait!  This one always sells out.

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Toasty

July 03, 2014. Category: how to, weddings

 

Your friend has asked you to be Maid of Honor or Best Man for his or her wedding. Along with months of planning the big day comes one of the biggest responsibilities of all – the toast!

Here are a few DOs and DONTs to keep and mind as you prepare:

DO: Introduce yourself and your relationship to the bride (or groom) first. Thanking the bride or groom’s parents for hosting is also a nice touch, and another way to kill time while you get everyone’s attention.

DON’T: Tell too many inside jokes. If you “had to be there”, its better off left out.

DO: Keep it short. As Shakespeare said, “Brevity is the soul of wit.”

DON’T: Talk about the bride or groom’s past relationships. Clearly, those were not meant to be!

DO: Write it down if necessary. In this case it is more important to say what you had intended to say rather than go “off the cuff”.

DON’T: Drink too much beforehand. You want to be relaxed of course, but no one enjoys a slurred speech.

DO: Stay appropriate. Remember your audience. There is no reason to be raunchy around  Nana.

DON’T: Forget the groom (or bride!). Make sure to include both the bride and groom in your toast, it is both of their big days.

DO: Be (at least a little) sentimental. Conclude with raising a glass to the bride and groom and wishing them a lifetime of happiness.

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Not the least bit Boar’d

June 20, 2014. Category: Flowers, photographer, real wedding, weddings

We are in Charlottesville prepping for a wedding this weekend and it is bringing back such wonderful memories of  Anna and Steve’s wedding this weekend last year.

 

  This fun and beautiful event at The Boar’s Head in Charlottesville captured by the talented Jen Fariello.

The bride’s talent bridesmaid created her gorgeous suite of paper.

 Anna accented her gown with a white bouquet from Beehive Events.

 

Happy Anniversary Mr. & Mrs. Kalarites

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Write Way

June 12, 2014. Category: Invitations, modern, printed materials, traditions, weddings

Once upon a time, pretty much everyone subscribed to standard wedding invitation wordings.  As the bride’s parents typically paid for the occasion, invites usually said that “they requested the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter”. These days, with divorce, blended families, and other nontraditional family dynamics helping to put together your special day, figuring out appropriate invitation phrasing has gotten complicated!

Here are a few common tricky situations, and the fitting invitation wording for each.  Keep in mind that you can always adapt the following language to suit your event

The bride’s parents are hosting, but would like to include groom’s parents on the invitation:

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Abbet

request the honor of your presence

at the marriage of their daughter

Samantha Marie

to Jason Christopher Smith

son of Mr. and Mrs. John Smith

etc.

Both sets of parents are funding the wedding:

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Abbet

and

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith

request the honor of your presence

at the marriage of their children

Samantha and Jason

etc.

 The bride and groom are paying for the wedding themselves:

The honor of your presence

is requested at the marriage of

Miss Samantha Marie Abbet

to

Mr. Jason Christopher Smith

etc.

OR, including their parents

Together with their families

 Miss Samantha Marie Abbet

and

Mr. Jason Christopher Smith

request the honor of your presence

at their marriage

etc.

EtiquettePicture_02

Widowed Parents: Bride’s Mother has not Remarried

Mrs. Thomas Abbet

requests the honor of your presence

at the wedding of her daughter

Samantha Marie

to Jason Christopher Smith

etc.

Divorced Parents- The Bride’s Mother has Remarried

Mrs. Jacob Henderson

Mr. Thomas Abbet

request the honor of your presence

at the wedding of their daughter

Samantha Marie

to Jason Christopher Smith

etc.

Separated Parents have two options:

Option One

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Abbet

request the honor of your presence

at the marriage of their daughter

Samantha Marie

to Jason Christopher Smith

OR

Option Two

Mrs. Jacob Henderson

Mr. Thomas Abbet

request the honor of your presence

at the wedding of their daughter

Samantha Marie

to Jason Christopher Smith

 

Etiquette formatting information is provided by Crane’s Blue Book of Stationery .

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